Ms. Bangma
Ms. Beech
Ms. Coates-Leckie
Ms. Cipriani
Mr. Hall
Mr. Martino
Ms. McCormac
Ms. McKnight
Mr. Presutti
Ms. Pacheco
Ms. Ristok
Ms. Siuda
Mr. Stewart
Mr. Thompson
Ms. Watson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parents: Check attendance and track credits


Currently in our 125th year, our present compliment of over 1800 staff and students believe in a high degree of commitment to both school and community. We value an educational environment where with effort, students can learn and achieve both academic and co-curricular excellence.

GDHS has a wide variety of programs and courses available to its students. These programs prepare students for university, colleges, apprenticeships and school-to-work transition programs. GDHS is an International Baccalaureate World School. It is also home to the Ontario Youth Apprentice Program, and a brand new High Skills Major in Environmental Science.

We have a demonstrated record of achieving excellence in the field of academics, technology and the arts. Our music program consistently wins national awards and is 250+ members strong. We are the “Home of the Rebels” and have a strong tradition in the area of school athletics. GDHS has achieved district, regional and provincial awards in many sports, such as volleyball, swimming, basketball, hockey and wrestling to name a few.

The history of GDHS is integral to history of the Georgetown community.

 

 
   

 

 

 

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English Grade Nine

Click HERE for the full ministry document.
  The grade nine English level courses are designed to develop the oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills that students need for success in their secondary school programs and in their daily lives. Students will analyse literary texts from contemporary and historical periods, interpret informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on the use of strategies that contribute to effective communication. The courses are intended to prepare students for the Grade 10 English courses, which leads to university or college preparation courses in Grades 11 and 12.

By the end of Grade 9, students will:

- explain how both simple and complex media texts are created to suit particular purposes and audiences

- interpret simple and complex media texts,

- identifying and explaining the overt and implied messages they convey

- evaluate how effectively information, ideas, issues, and opinions are communicated in both simple and complex media texts and decide whether the texts achieve their intended purpose

- identify and explain different audience responses to selected media texts identify the perspectives and/or biases evident in both simple and complex media texts

- comment on any questions they may raise about beliefs, values, and identity

- explain how several different production, marketing, and distribution factors influence the media industry

Students develop an understanding of the conventions of narrative literature and language. Students read and study a range of short narratives, including short stories, novellas, narrative poetry, myths, legends, short animated films, and short feature films. They apply appropriate strategies to read, understand, and interpret narrative texts. Students use their knowledge of the elements of the narrative, such as plot, character, setting, conflict, theme, and mood to understand and interpret narrative texts. Students demonstrate their understanding of narrative by recording their thoughts, ideas, and feelings in a variety of personal and interactive responses and by creating and sharing their own narratives. Students write descriptive and expository paragraphs, thereby providing a foundation for writing the five-paragraph essay. Ongoing personal reading and writing are essential for students to develop mature communication skills.

English Grade Ten

Click HERE for the full ministry document.  

This course is designed to extend the range of oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills that students need for success in their secondary school academic programs and in their daily lives. Students will analyse literary texts from contemporary and historical periods, interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on the selective use of strategies that contribute to effective communication. This course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 11 university or college preparation course.

Due to the pervasive influence in our lives of print and electronic media, it is important for students to learn how to understand and interpret media works. In the English Program, students should have frequent opportunities to analyze various aspects of media communications, including key elements of the works themselves, the audience and production codes and practices. Students should also learn about the media through the process of creating their own media works, using a range of technologies to do so. By working in the various media to communicate their own ideas, students will develop critical thinking skills and understand at first hand how media works are designed to influence audiences and reflect the perspectives of their creators. Students will also develop production skills that may open up career opportunities in the entertainment and communications industries. Students should be encouraged to appreciate the media as sources of personal information and pleasure.

English Grade Eleven

Click HERE for the full ministry document.  

This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures, as well as a range of informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using language with precision and clarity and incorporating stylistic devices appropriately and effectively. The course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 university or college preparation course. In the culminating unit, students apply skills and knowledge developed throughout the course in an individualized study of an independently chosen novel. They demonstrate their achievement of the relevant expectations in an oral presentation, which includes a media component. The focus is a particular theme and a full analysis of the novel as it pertains to the classics in literature. The teacher provides opportunities for conferencing and direction on a regular basis. This represents not only a culmination of the students’ work, but also a reflection of the essential structure of the course. The culminating unit provides students with opportunities to demonstrate what the course demonstrates, an examination of key themes and issues across a variety of texts and media. It is important to introduce the culminating unit tasks to the students at the beginning of the course and to refer to it throughout. Activities have been planned in each unit to work towards the Culminating Unit. Many smaller activities have been used more than once to facilitate improvement. The Culminating Unit should be mentioned to students throughout the course to focus their attention on the relevant skills and concepts being developed. The teacher works with the library staff and members of the English department to develop the different units in this course. Many resources may be effectively substituted based on availability, student cultural mix, and teacher preference. Throughout the course, students are provided with multiple opportunities to refine their writing skills, with a focus on developing the skills they need in an academic setting, regardless of the program they enter. It is important for the teacher to model a variety of organizational strategies for developing writing plans and to provide structure and guidance for the writing process, including self and peer editing and revision. Successful writing depends on students achieving the language expectations relating to grammar and spelling. These can be effectively taught through focused mini-lessons, provided by the teacher as appropriate, addressing gaps identified in student work.

English Grade Twelve

Click HERE for the full ministry document.  

This course emphasizes consolidation of literacy, critical thinking, and communication skills. Students will analyse a range of challenging texts from various time periods, countries, and cultures; write analytical and argumentative essays and a major paper for an independent research project; and apply key concepts to analyse media works. An important focus will be on understanding academic language and using it coherently and confidently in discussion and argument. The expectations in the compulsory courses of the English curriculum are organized in four strands, or broad areas of learning: Oral Communication, Reading and Literature Studies, Writing, and Media Studies. The program in all grades is designed to develop a range of essential skills in these four interrelated areas, built on a solid foundation of knowledge of the conventions of standard English and incorporating the use of analytical, critical, and metacognitive thinking skills. Students will:

- use critical listening skills to analyse and assess the content of oral presentations (e.g. assess the validity of the presenter's sources, arguments, and conclusions, detect assumptions, and omissions and provide missing information)

- use effective strategies, such as researching information and ideas, organizing, rehearsing and revising, to plan and present seminars, debates, and independent study projects

- use techniques for making effective oral presentations, with a focus on organizing material coherently, providing significant evidence, using imagery, analogy and parallel structures, and incorporating participatory activities, visual aids and technology

English International Baccalaureate

Click HERE for the full ministry document.  

The IB Diploma Programme is designed as an academically challenging and balanced programme of education with final examinations that prepares students, normally aged 16 to 19, for success at university and life beyond. The programme is normally taught over two years and has gained recognition and respect from the world's leading universities. The curriculum IB Diploma Programme students study six courses at higher level or standard level. Students must choose one subject from each of groups 1 to 5, thus ensuring breadth of experience in languages, social studies, the experimental sciences and mathematics. The sixth subject may be an arts subject chosen from group 6, or the student may choose another subject from groups 1 to 5. In addition the programme has three core requirements that are included to broaden the educational experience and challenge students to apply their knowledge and understanding. The extended essay is a requirement for students to engage in independent research through an in-depth study of a question relating to one of the subjects they are studying. Theory of knowledge is a course designed to encourage each student to reflect on the nature of knowledge by critically examining different ways of knowing (perception, emotion, language and reason) and different kinds of knowledge (scientific, artistic, mathematical and historical). Creativity, action, service requires that students actively learn from the experience of doing real tasks beyond the classroom. Students can combine all three components or do activities related to each one of them separately.

English Special Education


Click HERE for the full ministry document.  

All students require support from teachers, classmates, family, and friends in order to thrive and to gain full benefit from their school experience. Some students have special needs that require supports beyond those ordinarily received in the school setting. In Ontario, students who have behavioural, communicational, intellectual, physical or multiple exceptionalities, may have educational needs that cannot be met through regular instructional and assessment practices. These needs may be met through accommodations, and/or an educational program that is modified above or below the age-appropriate grade level expectations for a particular subject or course. Such students may be formally identified as exceptional pupils. The ministry sets out definitions of exceptionalities that must be used by school boards after determining that a student is an “exceptional pupil”. All students formally identified as exceptional by an Identification, Placement, and Review Committee (IPRC) must have access to an education that will enable them to develop the knowledge and skills they need in order to participate in the life of Ontario's communities. The Education Act on Special Education and Regulations made under the Act require school boards to provide exceptional pupils with special education programs and special education services that are appropriate for their needs. Specific procedures for the identification and placement of exceptional pupils are set out in Regulation 181/98. This regulation also provides for the regular review of the identification and placement of a student and for the appeal of identification and/or placement decisions with which parents/guardians disagree. The document, Highlights of Regulation 181/98, is available on this website. In the 2007/2008 school year (the most recent figures available) more than 192,000 students were identified by an IPRC as exceptional pupils. A further 96,600 students who were not formally identified were provided with special education programs and services. School boards must develop an Individual Education Plan (IEP) for every identified student. School boards also have the discretion to develop an IEP for students who have not been formally identified as exceptional. An IEP is a written plan describing the special education program and/or services required by a particular student, based on a thorough assessment of the student's strengths and needs that affect the student's ability to learn and demonstrate learning. A student's IEP must typically have a direct progress reporting link to the Provincial Report Card. In some cases, a student's program will include expectations derived from an alternative program (such as social skills, communication, and behaviour management). Alternative programs are intended to supplement, not replace, the student's access to the provincial curriculum. If a parent believes their child will benefit from an IEP and the school board does not agree, the parent has the right to request that an IPRC meet to determine if their child is an exceptional student. All exceptional students must have an IEP.

English: Media

Click HERE for the full ministry document.  

The secondary English curriculum has four strands: Literature Studies and Reading, Writing, Language, and Media Studies. The media education strand includes critical thinking components and constitutes a quarter of the learning expectations. Media components are also integrated within the other three strands. The English curriculum for Grades 11 and 12 also includes an optional Media Studies course, which is built around the study of media texts, media audiences and media production. Other optional courses in Canadian Literature, Writers' Craft and Literacy also include media-related expectations.

- demonstrate an understanding of a variety of media texts, audiences, and industry practices by analysing representations, forms, and techniques in media works;

- demonstrate an understanding of the relationships among form, purpose, audience, and production techniques by designing or creating media works, independently and collaboratively, based on ideas, themes, and issues examined in this course.

Analysing Media and Media Works

- demonstrate critical thinking skills by identifying bias and by analysing explicit and implicit messages in media works (e.g., explain the effect of images used in a film; identify the perspective of a newspaper or magazine);

- explain how the form, technique, style, and language of a variety of media forms create meaning (e.g., compare the coverage of a current event by newspapers, analyse the relationship between media works and their audiences (e.g., prepare for a panel discussion on how advertising campaigns target different audiences; identify the demographic profile of the target audience for a television show or radio station and assess how the content and advertising match the audience);

- explain the relationship among media works, media industry practices including marketing and distribution methods, and media industry codes and government regulations (e.g., explain the use of media to launch a new product line).

Concept #2: The media construct reality The media are responsible for the majority of the observations and experiences from which we build up our personal understandings of the world and how it works. Much of our view of reality is based on media messages that have been pre-constructed and have attitudes, interpretations and conclusions already built in. The media, to a great extent, give us our sense of reality.


Creating Media Works

- design or create media works based on ideas, themes, and issues examined in this course (e.g., create media works based on a theme from literature, using available resources; write dialogue for a commercial to promote sales of a novel; create a promotional campaign to sell the same idea or service to two or more different audiences);

- use knowledge of the relationships among form, purpose, audience, and production options to explain choices made in the design or production of media works (e.g., present media works to peers and explain solutions to problems encountered during the production process).

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English Grade Nine

Click HERE for full ministry document.Sed ut perspiciatis unde omnis iste natus error sit voluptatem accusantium doloremque laudantium, totam rem aperiam, eaque ipsa quae ab illo inventore veritatis et quasi architecto beatae vitae dicta sunt explicabo. Nemo enim ipsam voluptatem quia voluptas sit aspernatur aut odit aut fugit, sed quia consequuntur magni dolores eos qui ratione voluptatem sequi nesciunt. Neque porro quisquam est, qui dolorem ipsum quia dolor sit amet, consectetur, adipisci velit, sed quia non numquam eius modi tempora incidunt ut labore et dolore magnam aliquam quaerat voluptatem. Ut enim ad minima veniam, quis nostrum exercitationem ullam corporis suscipit laboriosam, nisi ut aliquid ex ea commodi consequatur? Quis autem vel eum iure reprehenderit qui in ea voluptate velit esse quam nihil molestiae consequatur?

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